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  • Easy Wire Management

    Wire management is always a dilemma for interior designers, and always a sign that planning for it was not an after-thought. But in the event it was overlooked, here are some really cool ideas for wire management throughout the house that won’t break the bank.

    Every house has a few extra of these all the time. Make it pretty with some wrapping paper or paint.

    Every house has a few extra of these all the time. Why not make them pretty with some wrapping paper or paint!


    Be sure and label those cords on the plug end.  If you do not have a labeling machine, just use a piece of paper, write the component name, then cover with tape.

    Be sure and label those cords on the plug end. If you do not have a labeling machine, just use a piece of paper, write the component name, then cover with tape.


    Why not find a pretty box and put that power strip in it.  Just cut some holes for the wires and store the excess wires in there too.

    Why not find a pretty box and put that power strip in it. Just cut some holes for the wires and store the excess wires in there too.


    Bunch those cables together.  Use cable ties or all plastic garbage ties. But wire twisty ties are not a good idea.

    Bunch those cables together. Use cable ties or all plastic garbage ties. But wire twisty ties are not a good idea.


    This is my favorite.  when you are plugging things in all by yourself, it would be helpful to have an extra set of hands.  These paper clips work great to hold the wire in place while you reposition to grab it and plug it in.

    This is my favorite. when you are plugging things in all by yourself, it would be helpful to have an extra set of hands. These paper clips work great to hold the wire in place while you reposition to grab it and plug it in.

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  • Contemporary vs. Traditional vs. Transitional

    Contemporary Interiors

    Form and architectural features

    Form and architectural features

    Base color is neutral, whites, greys, beige with “pops” of color

    Color in accessories, art, and nature

    Use of an antique or two is ok, depending on the piece

    No elaborate window treatments, main purpose is privacy

    Not cluttered

    Lighting design is critical

    Clean sleek lines

    Contrast of texture and shiny creates interest

    Personalizing with accessories is important

    Natural materials, woods, stone, leather

    Emphasis of architectural features

    Different degrees of contemporary- soft, relaxed, Euro, minimalist

    Traditional Interiors

    Note the symmetry used in this formal traditional entry. Grandma's sideboard has it's own special inset so it doesn't clutter the traffic flow and gives guests room to mingle.

    Note the symmetry used in this formal traditional entry. Grandma’s sideboard has it’s own special inset so it doesn’t clutter the traffic flow and gives guests room to mingle.

    Many different degrees of traditional design from formal to very relaxed

    Many different flavors, French, Early American, Italian, English

    It is very difficult to mesh the flavors

    Color in fabrics and accessories

    Fabrics play a big role in traditional design

    Mix mass pieces with form pieces of furniture

    Use of collections integrated in the design

    Symmetry creates a more formal design

    Use of neutrals can be useful to relax the design

    Antiques are critical for a successful design

    Elaborate window coverings are more easily integrated

    Transitional Decor/Eclectic Interiors

    This is transitional, contemporary furniture and light with softened  traditional elements like the draperies and accessories.

    This is transitional, contemporary furniture and light fixture with softened traditional elements like the draperies and accessories.

    Anything goes

    Very personalized use of accessories

    Very difficult to achieve a successful design without professional assistance

    Pieces of contemporary and traditional design

    Take care with color to not overdue with lots of neutrals to offset.

    Do not clutter. Remember less is more.

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  • Copper – The “NEW” Metal

    Copper is the latest trend in metals.
    Pendant Lighting
    media.designerpages.com
    Mirrors inspired by the mining industry.
    Copper_Trend_hunting_and_narud_copper_mirrors

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  • Appliques for almost any application

    LOVE!
    04_r4_c1

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  • See-Through Concrete: 5 Real-Life, Light-Transmitting Walls

    http://dornob.com/see-through-concrete-5-real-life-light-transmitting-walls/

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  • TERMISTOP

    Termistop flanges and blockouts are designed to give PCO’s
    a non-chemical, long-lasting termite protection at the service penetrations through the slab. Once installed, Termistop eliminates these hidden termite entry points because the mesh is too small to squeeze through and too hard to chew through. Termistop stops termites in their tracks. PERIOD!

    Termistop is International Code Council approved for new construction, has completed 9 years of USDA Forestry Service Testing with no failures, and recognized by Green Building Industry professionals. Termistop is designed to eliminate the need for chemical retreatments in the interior of the home, giving homeowners a termiticide-free living area.

    Termistop flanges and blockouts are designed to give PCO’s a non-chemical, long lasting termite protection at the service penetrations through the slab.
    Why Do I Need It?

    By nature, concrete slabs set, shrink, expand and create gaps between utility pipe penetrations and the concrete itself—gaps large enough for termite entry. Termites commonly use such piping as direct highways right into homes or structures.
    And often, termites that enter homes through these areas go undetected longer which enables them to do far more damage before being discovered. This damage can lead to repair bills in the thousands!
    Green Building Benefits

    Termistop Flanges and Blockouts are a non-chemical solution that prevents termites from entering the home at the service penetrations through the slab. The stainless-steel mesh creates a “physical barrier” to termite entry when it “keys” into the concrete. By addressing these areas during construction with Termistop flanges and blockouts, PCO’s reduce the need to apply chemical termiticides within the living space of the building.

    Many green building programs around the country emphasize the use of physical barriers and non-chemical termite solutions. Termistop qualifies as a physical barrier in many of these programs and will capture points for the builder in some of the green building rating systems.

    Termistop and the full Termimesh system have been specified in many high-profile green building projects around the United States in both residential and commercial construction. Listen to what one of the premier green building architects in the nation has to say about the product. For more information visit www.termistopusa.com.

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  • PANTONE FASHION COLOR REPORT • FALL 2012

    http://www.pantone.com/pages/fcr.aspx?pg=20948&ca=4&from=hpfeatures

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  • Understanding the differences between the types of lighting

    Incandescent, Halogen, Fluorescent, LED – Which is best? Wattage is not the proper indicator for the amount of light a lamp produces. Refer to lumens for that reference.
    Also critical for lamping decisions is color temperature. Refer to the following chart for help in deciding which lamp to buy.

    Lumens
    Typical Product
    Efficiacy (lumens/watt)
    Est. Annual Energy Use*
    Est. Annual Electricity Cost*
    125
    3 watt CFL
    41
    5 kWh
    $0.60
    150
    3.5 watt LED
    43
    6 kWh
    $0.70
    185
    15 watt krypton
    12
    27 kWh
    $2.93
    210
    25 watt incandescent
    8
    46 kWh
    $5.01
    ambient lighting
    400
    9 watt CFL
    44
    16 kWh
    $1.80
    450
    8 watt LED
    56
    15 kWh
    $1.60
    460
    40 watt incandescent
    12
    73 kWh
    $8.02
    500
    10 watt CFL
    50
    18 kWh
    $2.00
    general room lighting
    800
    12.5 watt LED
    64
    23 kWh
    $2.51
    890
    60 watt incandescent
    15
    109 kWh
    $12.03
    900
    15 CFL
    60
    27 kWh
    $2.93
    1,000
    12.5 watt LED downlight
    80
    23 kWh
    $2.51
    1,180
    75 watt incandescent
    16
    133 kWh
    $15.04
    1,200
    20 watt CFL
    60
    35 kWh
    $4.01
    suitable for reading
    1,750
    100 watt incandescent
    17
    182 kWh
    $20.06
    1,750
    29 watt CFL
    60
    53 kWh
    $5.82

    How does halogen enter into this mix? As a point of reference, a 60 watt halogen lamp produces as much light as a regular 100 watt incandescent lamp.
    * Estimated annual energy use based on 5 hours per day. Estimated annual energy cost based on electric rate of $0.1099/kWh (Jan 2011 US national average)
    This table provided by EFI.

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  • Pantone Reveals Color of the Year for 2012

    http://www.pantone.com/pages/pantone/pantone.aspx?pg=20946&ca=10

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  • Sexy Retractable Awnings

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